Archive for category: Activities & Seasonal Information

Five Fun and Distant Family Activities

Have some summer fun in the Park with your family! Here are five socially distant  activities you can do in the Park.

  • Connect with Nature

Download our Backyard Birding activity, and see how many types of birds you can spot in Piedmont Park. You can also use our “iNaturalist Companion” download to take a hike around the Park.

  • Family Picnic

If you’re in the mood for a more relaxing day, sit on the Front Lawn and have a picnic. All you need is a blanket and a cooler full of your favorite foods.

  • Scavenger Hunt

Another great idea to keep the whole family entertained is a scavenger hunt. Download our Piedmont Park Nature Scavenger Hunt. We recommend starting your journey at the Welcome Plaza.
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  • Family Field Day

For an active experience, host a family field day! Bring a frisbee, soccer ball or football, and visit one of the many open fields at the Park to play all day.

  • Arts and Crafts

Finally, just have a quiet day with your loved ones. Find a shady spot and do some arts and crafts. Bring a mat for easy cleanup and finger paint. You could also make your own giant bubbles, impression sculptures with fallen leaves or beaded sun catchers. The possibilities are really endless.

We hope you are inspired by some of these activities and have a great day spending quality time with your loved ones! 

Want more? Find several family fun activities on our online learning hub. Also, receive updates and stay connected with live readings, YouTube activities and more by subscribing to our “Connect and Learn” Instagram page: @piedmontlearns

Author: Olivia O’Brien

PC: Bee Downtown

Bee Aware: Spring May Bring Honeybee Colonies to Piedmont Park

If you’ve visited Piedmont Park recently, you may have noticed something unusual in the trees near the Invesco Beehives in the Piedmont Commons. You may also wonder if it was left there on accident.

Photo Credit: Bee Downtown

These biodegradable landscaping pots were hung in the trees on purpose by our friends at Bee Downtown. The pots are called “swarm traps” and are used for best beekeeping practices from the months of March through July. Honeybee colonies grow quickly, and when they outgrow their hive, spread through a process called swarming.

PC: Bee Downtown

Photo Credit: Bee Downtown

When a colony swarms, 60% of the bees leave the hive to search for a new one. The group takes flight, clusters up and latches on to whatever they can find while scout bees look for a new home. This is where the swarm traps are put to use. They provide a home for the colony and allow Bee Downtown to safely relocate the bees to a more permanent home.

While alarming at first, honeybee swarms are harmless. The bees have no home so they have nothing to defend and their bellies are so full of honey that they can’t bend over to sting!

Photo Credit: Bee Downtown

If you see a swarm anywhere, whether it’s on a tree or in a box, please call or text the Lead BDT Beekeeper, Nick Weaver, at 678-779-8143 or Pam Allen at 770-310-1673. 

If you have any bee-related questions or concerns, please email info@bee-downtown.com

How to Exercise Safely During the Cold Season

When winter’s long and cold days descend, it can be hard to wake up in the morning, let alone exercise outside.

However, exercising outdoors is good for your body and mind any time of year, especially during the winter months—as long as you pay attention to a few rules regarding safety, gear and the type of exercise. By taking these measures, cold-weather workouts can be comfortable, injury-free and most important, fun.

Note—Talk to your doctor before you brave the cold outdoors. Exercise should be safe for almost everyone, even in plummeting temperatures. But if you have certain chronic conditions, such as Raynaud’s disease, asthma, or heart issues, consult with your doctor first to review any precautions to take based on your condition.

The Primary Risks

Frostbite

During the cold season, there are exercise-related dangers that go beyond slipping on ice and falling.

Frostbite is a cold-induced injury that occurs when unprotected skin is in direct contact with the cold air for an extended period, “freezing” in the process. This usually happens when skin temperatures drop below 30 degrees F. Susceptible areas include the cheeks, nose and ears, as well as the hands and feet.

Fortunately, frostbite isn’t technically an acute injury—it doesn’t strike out of the blue. Stop it in its tracks by paying attention to the following signs:

  • Tingling sensations
  • Burning
  • Aching
  • Numbness
  • Skin redness

If you suspect frostbite, get out of the cold quickly, and warm the affected area by running it under lukewarm water. Never rub the area as doing so may further damage your skin. Seek medical attention if symptoms don’t subside.

Hypothermia

One of the challenging and potentially life-threatening risks of winter training is hypothermia. This condition consists of an abnormal drop in body temperature, plummeting to dangerous levels. It happens when your body fails to warm itself, losing more heat than it produces, especially when core temperature dips below 95 degrees F.

When this occurs, your vital systems, especially your cardiovascular and nervous systems, cease to function properly and leads to heart trouble, respiratory failure and even death.

The key to preventing hypothermia is heeding the early warning signs. These include:

  • Abnormal fast breathing
  • Inability to think clearly
  • Fumbling or difficult movements
  • Intense shivering
  • Loss of focus and coordination
  • Dizziness and nausea
  • Unusual fatigue
  • Confusion and/or poor decision making.
  • Pain in extremities

As soon as you experience two or more of these side effects, stop running on the spot, and get into a warm bath. This should help get your temperature up. Showing no improvement? Call 9-1-1 immediately.

 

Follow these guidelines for exercising safely during the cold months.

Re-Think Your Clothing

The first step to prepare for cold-weather outdoor exercise is getting the right attire. Suitable materials include nylon, polyesters, and polypropylene. The best combination is to mix these technical fabrics that wick away moisture while keeping your body dry and warm. Wool or fleece, along with a water-proof, wind-resistant outer layer all work well.

Avoid cotton. The stuff soaks up sweat and rain, and holds in moisture.

Here’s your essential workout gear when stocking for the winter season.

  • Medium-weight base layer shirt
  • Hat, headband, or ski mask
  • Running gloves or mittens
  • A running jacket
  • Running tights or pants
  • Merino wool socks or those made of technical fabric

Use Layers

Layers help trap warm air next to your body and fend off the elements while keeping you warm and comfortable the entire time. They can also be easily removed as conditions change during your workout.  Zip or unzip your running jacket, remove your mittens or take off a mid-layer to adjust as you run.

Start with a thin, basic layer of high-performance fabric to soak up to excess sweat away from your skin. Then, add a mid-layer of fleece or wool for extra insulation and warmth.

For your outer layer—or the shell—a light water-resistance jacket works best.  This helps expel moisture and protect you from the elements.

The 10-Degree Rule

Regardless of how cold it is, you’ll warm up quickly once you start working up a sweat. That’s why when choosing gear for cold-weather exercise, the rule of thumb is to dress as if it’s 10 to 15 degrees warmer than the actual outside temperature—no matter how tempting is to overdress to stave off the cold.

Of course, you’ll feel cold at first, but once you start moving and raising your core temperature, you’ll find yourself much more comfortable.

Freezing Levels

When temperatures dip to freezing levels, blood flow is prioritized to the core, so be sure to protect your extremities such as your head, hands, and feet from the cold. Since we lose a large percentage of body heat through the head, headcover is non-negotiable.  A hat or headband protects your ears and head. For extreme cold wear a ski mask, scarf, or balaclava to cover your face.

Protect your hands with a thin pair of glove liners made of technical fabric—such as polypropylene—under a pair of mittens lined with fleece or wool.

Last but not least, protect your feet. Opt for socks that wick away moisture while keeping your feet warm. Think SmartWool socks. Also, make sure the shoes are one half-size bigger than you usually wear to allow wiggle room for thick or multiple socks.

To avoid slipping or falling, choose sports shoes with enough traction to prevent falls, especially if it’s snowy or icy.  You can also use special traction devices that attach to your trainers, such as Yaktrax.

Keep it Close

Keep your running routes close to home base. Choose a well-lit, familiar, loop that’s relatively short, especially if you’re running alone. Avoid exercising anywhere you don’t feel completely safe.

Be Seen

When it’s dark outside, you must be visible to other people, especially motorists. Put on reflective, light-colored clothing, such as fluorescent yellow or white, to help you be better seen by drivers, bikers, and pedestrians.

Consider wearing a lightweight headlamp or donning a flashing light, especially early in the morning or late in the evening.  Run against traffic, drivers will see you more easily and you will see them.

Carry Your Essentials

Have some cash and cell phone so in case of an emergency. I recommend that you carry a Road ID bracelet that contains your name, age, blood type, and emergency contacts—you know, all the important things just in case.

Conclusion

Fortunately, many of the risks associated with exercising in winter can be easily thwarted by listening to your body, dressing appropriately and taking the right safety measures.

Please feel free to leave your winter workouts stories and questions in the comment section below. I’d love to hear from you.

In the meantime, thank you for dropping by.

Keep exercising strong.

Guest Author: David Dack

About the author:

David Dack is an established fitness blogger and running expert. When he’s not training for his next marathon, he’s doing research and trying to help as many people as possible to share his fitness philosophy. Check his blog Runners Blueprint for more info.

Testing on Treats: Children and Teens Become Scientists for Halloween

For October’s Homeschool Day, students of all ages learned the scientific method with the help of Halloween candy.

K – 5th Grade’s White demo activity, where grade students learned about density, the scientific method and how to make a hypothesis

6th – 12th Grade’s demo activity, where middle and high schoolers learned how to apply the scientific method and create

Walker’s jack-o-lantern, featuring a hydrogen peroxide solution.

Dana Buskovitz, education coordinator, and Kaycee Walker, assistant education coordinator, collaborate together on a science lesson plan for each Homeschool Day, which started one year ago.

“We started Homeschool Day because we wanted to reach out to all students,” Dana said.

The lesson plan was Halloween inspired, just in time for the upcoming holiday. However, there was a twist.

Grade school students hypothesized which candy bars would sink or float.

Middle and high schooler students hypothesized which type of solvents would dissolve candy corn the fastest.

Students were not allowed to eat the candy! But they were able to play with their food as they performed science experiments.

Grade schoolers completed a STEM challenge to construct a cube from gummy drops and toothpicks.

Middle and high schoolers built catapults out of forks, spoons, popsicle sticks and rubber bands. They then competed in a candy corn launching contest to see whose would go the farthest.

If you would like to join the Conservancy for next month’s Homeschool Day, you can register at piedmontpark.org/homeschool. If you would like to sign up for a field trip in the Park, you can schedule a field trip at piedmontpark.org/field-trips.

Author: Jessica Vue

Celebrating 15 Years of Fresh Produce at Green Market

Imagine, it’s a beautiful Saturday morning in April where the trees blossom and the birds sing. On this day, the Piedmont Park Conservancy introduces the Green Market to the public as part of its Centennial Celebration. Crowds of people stare in amazement as they await the unveiling. This is the start of something new.

We are proud to commemorate 15 years of Green Market at Piedmont Park. The Conservancy first introduced the Green Market on April 17, 2004 in partnership with the City of Atlanta Bureau of Cultural Affairs. As a key sponsor and supporter of the program, Kaiser Permanente greatly contributed to the Green Market’s success over the years. Since its debut, the program has influenced the diet and lifestyle of millions of visitors in the heart of Atlanta. 

In the beginning, the Green Market featured high quality, locally-grown produce, prepared goods, flowers, herbs and other specialty items. The program included chef demonstrations designed to showcase how fresh produce could be prepared at home and live music from local bands as entertainment. Now, the Green Market has board-certified dietitians who guide guests in their path of health and nutrition while utilizing market produce. Also, there is a kid-friendly activity center for guests with small children.

 “Green Market gives walkable access to local fresh produce, meat, baked goods and more. How amazing is it to walk out your door on a Saturday morning and do your shopping in one location?!” said Green Market Manager Mary Yetter.

Over the past decade, the staff at the Conservancy have played an integral part in the development of the Green Market. The program has been voted one of the top five farmer’s markets in Atlanta by Access Atlanta, and is currently available on Saturdays, March 30 – November from 9am to 1pm at 12th Street entrance.

In response to this momentous occasion, the Conservancy is hosting a party to celebrate Green Market’s 15th anniversary. Save the date for September 21, 2019.

This blog is in memory of Carrie Jennison, who helped establish the Green Market.

Author: Amari Woods

If It Walks Like A Duck

While walking around Lake Clara Meer, you’ve probably noticed ducks either swimming in the lake or hanging out on its banks. Have you ever wondered about the different types of ducks that inhabit the park and when during the year you can find them here?

In fact, more than 10 different types of ducks can be found in Piedmont Park, few of which actually have the word duck in their name.  Listed below are the formal names of ducks you can see during your visit to the park along with descriptive information about each type.  After the duck’s name is the time of year that each has been observed here.

Muscovy Duck (year-round)

With their long necks, heavy bodies, webbed feet and spatula-shaped bills, these birds are instantly recognizable as ducks but there are many clues that help Muscovy ducks stand out from the flock. Their relatively long bill is dark at the base with variable color bands along its length, including white, pale blue-white, and pink, and the nail at the bill’s tip is gray.  Even though the word Muscovy means “from Moscow”, these ducks are not from Moscow.

Ruddy Duck (January)

The ruddy duck is a species of stifftail duck (others include the masked duck and blue-billed duck) and is a diving duck with a spiky stiff tail which is used as a rudder while swimming.  The tail may also be held angled or vertically as a breeding or territorial display especially between competing males.  These ducks often have colorful bills and compact bodies.

Ring-necked Duck (November through April)

The ring-necked duck is a small to medium-sized diving duck that has two white rings surrounding its gray bill, a shiny black angular head, black back, white line on its wings, a white breast and yellow eyes.  The female has a grayish brown angular head and body with a dark brown back, a dark bill with a more subtle light band than the male, grayish-blue feet and brown eyes with white rings surrounding them. This duck is sometimes referred to as a ringbill.

Wood Duck (year-round)

The wood duck or Carolina duck is one of the most colorful North American waterfowl.  Breeding males exhibit ornate, colorful patterns visible up-close but appear dark overall at a distance; females are gray-brown with a thin white ring around the eye.  The wood duck possesses a crest on its head and flies through trees with exceptional maneuverability thanks to its long tail.  Often shy and quick, the wood duck’s call is a loud, screeching whistle.

Mallard (year-round)

Mallards are large ducks with hefty bodies, rounded heads and wide, flat bills.  The mallard’s body is long and the tail rides high out of the water, giving a blunt shape.  Male mallards have a dark, iridescent-green head and bright yellow bill.  The gray body is sandwiched between a brown breast and black rear.  Females and juveniles are brown with orange-and-brown bills. Both sexes have a white-bordered, blue patch on their wings.

Redhead (March)

The redhead goes by many names including the red-headed duck and is easily distinguished from other ducks by the male’s copper-colored head and bright blue bill during the breeding season.  Slightly larger than a ring-necked duck and slightly smaller than a canvasback, the redhead is a medium-sized diving duck with a smoothly rounded head and a moderately large bill.  Redheads have black-tipped, gray bills, and in flight they show gray flight feathers.

Canvasback (December & January)

The canvasback is the largest species of diving duck in North America measuring up to 22 inches in length and weighing up to 3.5 pounds.  The canvasback has a distinctive wedge-shaped head and long graceful neck.  Its sloping profile distinguishes it from other ducks.  Both male and female have a black bill; the male has a chestnut red head and neck while the female has a light brown head and neck.  The canvasback’s legs and feet are bluish-gray.

Northern Shoveler (Spring & Fall)

Appropriately nicknamed the spoonbill, the northern shoveler has the largest bill of any duck in North America. The bill is actually longer than the duck’s head with a flattened wide tip perfect for “shoveling” along the water’s surface for food.  Males have an iridescent green head; females are brown, buff and black with darker upperparts, finer streaking on the head and a faint dark eye line.  Both genders have yellow eyes, and bright orange legs and feet.

Blue-winged Teal (Spring & Fall)

There are more than 20 species of teal ducks throughout the world.  The blue-winged teal is a smaller, petite duck characterized by its short neck and short tail.  Males have brightly marked, distinctive plumage.  The unexpected shades may be difficult to see when the bird’s wings are folded but very colorful when in flight.  Females are more camouflaged with muted, earth tone colors which serve as protection while they are nesting or caring for young ducklings.

Lesser Scaup (January & March)

The lesser scaup is a medium-sized diving duck, smaller than the closely-related greater scaup, with a small peak at the back of the head.  It is colloquially known as the little bluebill or broadbill because of its distinctive blue bill. The lesser scaup is one of the most numerous and widespread diving ducks in North America.  Its name, scaup, may stem from the bird’s preference for feeding on scalp—the Scottish word for clams, oysters and mussels.

Bufflehead (February through April)

Adult males are striking black and white with iridescent green and purple heads and a large white patch behind the eye.  Females are gray-toned with a smaller white patch behind the eye and a light underside.  The bufflehead rivals the green-winged teal as the smallest American duck, measuring under 16 inches long and weighing under 20 oz.  Its name refers to its head shape, noticeable when the male puffs out the feathers on its head, greatly increasing its size.

Hooded Merganser (November & December)

The most prominent feature of this small, slim, streamlined duck is its narrow, serrated, hooked bill.  The merganser is the only type of duck that regularly eats a large amount of fish and similar prey, and its bill is specialized to make this duck a keen and ferocious hunter.  Two other species of this duck includes the common and the red-breasted merganser.

Piedmont Park Ducks – Do’s & Don’ts

Do’s

  • Only offer foods in bite-sized pieces the ducks can easily consume without choking or struggling.
  • Good foods for ducks include bite-sized pieces of apples and tomatoes, cracked corn, chopped kale, bite-sized pieces of romaine lettuce or Swiss chard and watermelon
  • Enjoy the experience of being in nature with these colorful birds

Don’ts

  • Don’t feed bread to the ducks; it’s not good for them
  • Do not allow pets or children to chase or disturb the ducks
  • Stop feeding if the ducks appear uninterested or are leaving the food uneaten, and avoid feeding the ducks if other visitors are already offering treats

Guest Post by Don Disner

AUTHOR’S BIO: Don Disner

Stop and Listen to the Birds Sing

If you’ve ever walked through Piedmont Park on a gorgeous spring day, you’ve likely been surrounded by the songs of more bird species than you realized were there. Before moving to Atlanta nine years ago, I could identify maybe five common songbirds and a few birds of prey, probably the same ones everyone knows. Though it’s nothing compared to dedicated birders, ornithologists, or even semi-serious hobbyists, I can easily ID three dozen or so now.

I’ve been lucky; most of my bird knowledge came to me through the grace of others- Books gifted from friends and family, bits of knowledge gleaned from birders, photographers, and friends who know more than me. Gray and brown birds on my home feeders, once lost in the fray, now stand out as chipping sparrows, house finches, brown-headed nuthatches, and several others.

Now I cannot help but notice dozens of species of birds when I’m outside. For me, lack of knowledge was a symptom of a lack of observation, and changing that behavior opened me up to an entire world.

Working in Piedmont Park, I take in as much as I can in between tasks, but as a park visitor you have the chance to sit back and observe. I strongly recommend you take advantage of sitting down on a bench, looking, listening, and noticing the birds. See if you can start picking them out by their call or colors.

Carolina Wren

With all that’s going on in our lives, it’s easy to inadvertently ignore all the different species of birds around you. For instance, the Carolina Wren as he, (only the males of the species sing) sings in a voice too big for his body. No doubt, if you live almost anywhere in the southeast, you have heard this call, but could you identify the wren by his song? If you saw him, would you recognize the shape of his body, upright tail, the white “eyebrow” line, or his thin, curving beak? These details, relied upon by birders, can easily go unnoticed unless we stop to see them.

Pileated Woodpecker

Over the sound of chirps, whistles, and trills, you may hear a distinct knocking on wood. A woodpecker will hammer on a tree in search of insects for lunch, or dig a hollow for a nest. If you can spot them, you’ll notice that they’re all some variation of black and white, usually with degrees of red on their heads. With the common downy woodpecker, a small red mark is a defining characteristic of the male. See the relatively large red bellied woodpecker, and you’ll likely wonder why it’s called that, since its bright head is redder than its belly. Let’s not forget the most famous (and largest) woodpecker, the pileated. The pileated woodpecker can be elusive, but you might find one feasting on grubs from a rotted tree trunk.

Brown Thrasher

Spring and fall turn the park into a hotbed for migratory birds avoiding harsh northern winters or revisiting breeding grounds, which creates great opportunity for interesting sightings. We have the easily recognizable northern cardinal, vibrant red (the females are more pinkish brown) with its bright orange beak, the American robin, foraging for worms on the ground in groups with their rusty orange chests and white rings around their eyes, and our friend from earlier, the Carolina wren. The northern mockingbird, a particularly vocal gray songster, can spout a dozen tunes in the span of a minute. They can have hundreds of songs in their repertoire, but our Georgia state bird, the brown thrasher, can have over a thousand!

American Robin

With the noise of civilization around us, birds provide a natural, meditative escape through their songs, their call and response, and variety in countless species. Whether or not you desire to know them all by name, or if you just want to enjoy their songs and observe their behavior, I sincerely hope that you take the  time (and now’s a good time to do it) to ignore everything else and focus on our feathered friends for a bit- watch, listen and be humbled by them. Learn a little or a lot, you’ll be richer for the experience- I promise.

Want to learn more about bird life in Piedmont Park? Sign up for one of our bird walks! https://piedmontpark.org/sightseeing-and-tours/

Author: Michael Paul

Photo Credits: Kevin Gaston

A Look Inside the Colorful World of Piedmont Park’s Spring Blooms

Spring is in full swing at Piedmont Park. The air is filled with fragrant and bountiful blooms that create a non-stop show. A green sanctuary in the middle of Atlanta, the Park is home to a diversity of trees that provide not only beauty, but habitat for hundreds of pollinators including bees, butterflies, birds and other critters that live in the Park.

From majestic oaks to diminutive dogwoods, these trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals also provide visitors with four seasons of color and a green oasis to enjoy throughout the year.

And if you’re inspired you may want to try growing some of these plants in your own garden.

Below is a list of garden-worthy plants to consider. Both the common and botanical names are listed so that if you are shopping for plants then you will know what to ask for.

Dogwoods, a favorite spring bloomer at Piedmont Park

Autumn Fern- Dryopteris erythrosora: This exotic ornamental makes itself right at home in southern gardens. The new growth emerges with bronzy tinges before it turns green which remind some of autumn.

Carolina Silverbell- Halesia carolina: This native small to medium sized flowering tree displays beautiful white bell shaped flowers. Full sun or part shade.

Carolina Silverbell, a great native plant with striking flowers.

Dogwood- Cornus florida: There are hundreds of native dogwoods growing throughout the park, easily recognizable by their beautiful white bracts in spring. The red fall fruits and red leaf color make it a standout in the fall.

Fringe Tree- Chionanthus virginicus: This native flowering tree produces masses of fleecy white flowers in spring.

Hellebore- Helleborus x hybrida, also known as Lenten roses: This evergreen groundcover blooms in late winter to early spring.

Native azaleas fill the air with their sweet perfume.

Native Azaleas- Rhododendron spp. including R. austrinum, and  R. canescens: bloom over a period of months beginning in early spring and continuing until late summer.

Redbuds- Cercis canadensis: is a small flowering tree with distinct lavender-pink flowers that appear before the heart shaped leaves.

Redbud flowers appear before the leaves emerge in spring.

White Oak- Quercus alba: This majestic native gets better and better with age. Be sure to give this beauty plenty of space as it becomes a large tree growing to heights of 50 to 80 feet tall, or more.  Oakleaf Hydrangeas-Hydrangea quercifolia- The leaves remind some of oak trees and the large white flowers standout in the landscape.

Want to do more for Piedmont Park’s plant life? Visit piedmontpark.org/support-the-park/commemorative-donations/ and learn how to plant your very own tree!

Author: Erica Glasener

Piedmont Park: A Place for Friends

Are you looking for a place to make new friends or new memories? Come on over to Piedmont Park and experience life in Atlanta’s favorite park! Piedmont Park is a bustling urban green space and full of life every day. Here are just a few ways you can get involved!

1) The Active Oval: The Active Oval is a staple of Piedmont Park and one of the best places to meet new people. Many different intramural sports teams reserve the space for their games, and there’s always room for another player. It also has a full track and fitness equipment, making it a great place to get your workout in!

2) Free Yoga on the Promenade: Every fourth Monday of the month, Piedmont Park offers a free yoga class on the Promenade. Grab your mat and head over because you’re bound to meet a ton of great people and maybe even find that workout buddy you’ve been searching for!

3) Picnics in the Park: Picnics in Piedmont Park are very popular among Atlantans and one of the best ways to spend a Sunday afternoon in the city. Pack your favorite snacks, round up your favorite people, and pick one of the many scenic spots in Piedmont Park to kick back and enjoy each other’s company!

4) Green Market: Every Saturday from 9:00 AM-1:00 PM, Piedmont Park hosts the Green Market, a local farmers market dedicated to bringing locally sourced produce to the Atlanta community. Start your Saturday right and come out to enjoy the incredible food trucks, unbeatably fresh produce, and captivating live music at one of Midtown’s favorite farmers markets!

5) Dog Parks: The Piedmont Park Dog Parks are one of the most utilized spaces at the Park. Grab your four-legged friends and check out our off-leash parks. Locals frequent the dog parks, making it one of the best places to meet new people. Not only will you meet dozens of your neighbors but even your pup will find a furry friend!

Whether you’re looking to get active, or looking for a spot to relax, Piedmont Park has a place for you! Piedmont Park welcomes everybody and is the perfect place to engage with your new community or to make memories with your friends!

Follow Piedmont Park on Instagram @piedmontpark to see more of what life is like inside the Park!

Author: Olivia Gage

Exploring Piedmont Park’s Northwoods

One of Atlanta’s best features is its easy access to incredible outdoor experiences in the Appalachians. For this reason, many of us can’t imagine living in a city without a short drive to abundant natural space. But for those who feel a lot more relaxed outside, midweek in the city can start to feel a little too cramped. Luckily, you don’t have to wait for the weekend!

You are probably familiar with Piedmont Park’s popular destinations like the Meadow, or the Dog Parks, and all 200 plus acres of the Park are great places to spend some time outdoors. Just north of those locations, though, the paths lead you through a tucked away tree lined expansion to the Park. This is over 53 acres added in 2011 that boast nature trails and conservation areas, Legacy Fountain, the Northwoods, and the Piedmont Commons. After a brief foray down these paths you’re sure to find your breathing calmed and eyes open to the chirping birds, rustling chipmunks, and all the colors of life. Here are some amazing views in the Piedmont Park expansion that feel miles away from the city.

Where better in the Park to sit and read or write for an hour, or two, or three or four? You don’t get the distractions of festivals out here, just the ambient sounds of nature and the words on the page!

A short walk past the Conservancy offices is the Promenade Lawn, a beautiful clearing on a plateau in the treetops to the east.

A look at forest serenity, but only a stone’s throw from your door! Find the wooden staircase in the Walker Woods for these unpaved views.

Straight outta Narnia, you find yourself on the other side of the wardrobe in the Northwoods’ forested paths.

Author: William Lange

Dog Park water fountains and restrooms are closed for repairs Learn More